Wissenschaft ermöglicht durch Exemplardaten

Xue, T., Gadagkar, S. R., Albright, T. P., Yang, X., Li, J., Xia, C., … Yu, S. (2021). Prioritizing conservation of biodiversity in an alpine region: Distribution pattern and conservation status of seed plants in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Global Ecology and Conservation, 32, e01885. doi:10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01885 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01885

The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) harbors abundant and diverse plant life owing to its high habitat heterogeneity. However, the distribution pattern of biodiversity hotspots and their conservation status remain unclear. Based on 148,283 high-resolution occurrence coordinates of 13,450 seed plants, w…

López‐Delgado, J., & Meirmans, P. G. (2021). History or demography? Determining the drivers of genetic variation in North American plants. Molecular Ecology. doi:10.1111/mec.16230 https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.16230

Understanding the impact of historical and demographic processes on genetic variation is essential for devising conservation strategies and predicting responses to climate change. Recolonization after Pleistocene glaciations is expected to leave distinct genetic signatures, characterised by lower ge…

Schneider, K., Makowski, D., & van der Werf, W. (2021). Predicting hotspots for invasive species introduction in Europe. Environmental Research Letters. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/ac2f19 https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ac2f19

Plant pest invasions cost billions of Euros each year in Europe. Prediction of likely places of pest introduction could greatly help focus efforts on prevention and control and thus reduce societal costs of pest invasions. Here, we test whether generic data-driven risk maps of pest introduction, val…

Song, H.-Z., Naugolnykh, S. V., Wu, X.-K., Liu, X.-Y., & Jin, J.-H. (2021). Fertile Woodwardia from the middle Eocene of South China and its implications for palaeogeography and palaeoclimate. Plant Diversity. doi:10.1016/j.pld.2021.09.003 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pld.2021.09.003

The genus Woodwardia, which together with the genera Anchistea and Lorinseria comprise the subfamily Woodwardioideae of Blechnaceae, has a disjunct distribution across Central and North America, Europe and the temperate to tropical areas of Asia. Fossil records of Woodwardia occur throughout the Pal…

Erickson, K. D., & Smith, A. B. (2021). Accounting for imperfect detection in data from museums and herbaria when modeling species distributions: combining and contrasting data‐level versus model‐level bias correction. Ecography. doi:10.1111/ecog.05679 https://doi.org/10.1111/ecog.05679

The digitization of museum collections as well as an explosion in citizen science initiatives has resulted in a wealth of data that can be useful for understanding the global distribution of biodiversity, provided that the well-documented biases inherent in unstructured opportunistic data are accoun…

Stone, B. W., & Wolfe, A. D. (2021). Phylogeographic analysis of shrubby beardtongues reveals range expansions during the Last Glacial Maximum and implicates the Klamath Mountains as a hotspot for hybridization. Molecular Ecology. doi:10.1111/mec.15992 https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15992

Quaternary glacial cycles often altered species' geographic distributions, which in turn altered the geographic structure of species' genetic diversity. In many cases, glacial expansion forced species in temperate climates to contract their ranges and reside in small pockets of suitable habitat (ref…

Lima, L. V., Oliveira, U., Almeida, T. E., Bueno, M. L., & Salino, A. (2021). Migration barriers in ferns: the case of the neotropical genus Diplopterygium (Gleicheniaceae). Plant Ecology & Diversity. doi:10.1080/17550874.2021.1890259 https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2021.1890259

Background: Despite the broad distribution of several species in Gleicheniaceae in the neotropical region, Diplopterygium is the only genus having a restricted distribution. Species of Gleicheniaceae occupy open (including anthropogenic) habitats and produce large amounts of wind-dispersed propagule…

Chauvel, B., Fried, G., Follak, S., Chapman, D., Kulakova, Y., Le Bourgeois, T., … Regnier, E. (2021). Monographs on invasive plants in Europe N° 5: Ambrosia trifida L. Botany Letters, 1–24. doi:10.1080/23818107.2021.1879674 https://doi.org/10.1080/23818107.2021.1879674

Ambrosia trifida L. (giant ragweed, Asteraceae) is native to the North American continent and was introduced into Europe and Asia at the end of the 19th century. In its native range, this tall annual species is common in riparian and ruderal habitats and is also a major weed in annual cropping syste…

Allstädt, F. J., Koutsodendris, A., Appel, E., Rösler, W., Reichgelt, T., Kaboth-Bahr, S., … Pross, J. (2021). Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene climate dynamics in western North America based on a new pollen record from paleo-Lake Idaho. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. doi:10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1 https://doi.org/10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1

Marked by the expansion of ice sheets in the high latitudes, the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation across the Plio/Pleistocene transition at ~ 2.7 Ma represents a critical interval of late Neogene climate evolution. To date, the characteristics of climate change in North America duri…

Brendel, M. R., Schurr, F. M., & Sheppard, C. S. (2020). Inter‐ and intraspecific selection in alien plants: How population growth, functional traits and climate responses change with residence time. Global Ecology and Biogeography. doi:10.1111/geb.13228 https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13228

Aim: When alien species are introduced to new ranges, climate or trait mismatches may initially constrain their population growth. However, inter‐ and intraspecific selection in the new environment should cause population growth rates to increase with residence time. Using a species‐for‐time approac…