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McGowan, N. E., Roche, N., Aughney, T., Flanagan, J., Nolan, P., Marnell, F., & Reid, N. (2021). Testing consistency of modelled predictions of the impact of climate change on bats. Climate Change Ecology, 2, 100011. doi:10.1016/j.ecochg.2021.100011 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecochg.2021.100011

Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are a cornerstone of climate change conservation research but temporal extrapolations into future climate scenarios cannot be verified until later this century. One way of assessing the robustness of projections is to compare their consistency between different mod…

Farooq, H., Azevedo, J. A. R., Soares, A., Antonelli, A., & Faurby, S. (2020). Mapping Africa’s biodiversity: More of the same is just not good enough. Systematic Biology. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syaa090 https://doi.org/10.1093/sysbio/syaa090

Species distribution data are fundamental to the understanding of biodiversity patterns and processes. Yet, such data are strongly affected by sampling biases, mostly related to site accessibility. The understanding of these biases is therefore crucial in systematics, biogeography and conservation. …

Cooper, N., Bond, A. L., Davis, J. L., Portela Miguez, R., Tomsett, L., & Helgen, K. M. (2019). Sex biases in bird and mammal natural history collections. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 286(1913), 20192025. doi:10.1098/rspb.2019.2025 https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.2025

Natural history specimens are widely used across ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation. Although biological sex may influence all of these areas, it is often overlooked in large-scale studies using museum specimens. If collections are biased towards one sex, studies may not be representativ…